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buy retin-a Online pharmacy viagra south africa Wynn and Lam passed the patient through the opening and into the hands of other volunteers stationed in the parking garage. A welcome breeze tunneled through the passageway. Wynn had no idea why it existed. Perhaps God had said there needed to be a hole there.

Glue Gun Stencil St. Patrick’s Day Shirt

glue gun stenciled st. patrick's day shirt

I’ve tried quite a few techniques for altering fabric:  stamping, dying, freezer-paper stenciling, etc.   As soon as I learned about glue gun stenciling I knew I had to try my hand at it. And, since green isn’t really a color my girls tend to have in their wardrobe, it seemed like a St. Patty’s day shirt would be the perfect project to give it a go.

 

How to Make a Glue Gun Stencil

The basic concept of making the stencil is super-simple:

  • Use a glue gun to create your design
  • Wait a little bit and let the glue to cool and harden
  • Carefully peel up the glue (you don’t want it breaking during the process of peeling it off)
  • Lay the stencil flat on the surface of your project
  • Paint over it
  • Remove stencil and smile

A Few Tips on Making and Using the Glue Gun Stencil

  1. Use wax paper.  I tried gluing my design onto wax paper, aluminum foil, freezer paper, and a glass plate to see which one would allow the glue to come up the easiest and the cleanest.  The wax paper was the easiest to get the glue off of.  Plus, it has the added benefit of being see-through so you can place a piece of paper under the wax paper with your design on it and trace over it with the glue gun.
  2. Spray a little Pam. Even with the wax paper, the glue was difficult to get completely off of the paper.  When I sprayed a little bit of cooking spray on the wax paper, the stencil was a breeze to get off. So, not only is it cleaner, but you’re more likely to maintain the integrity of your design.
  3. Keep your glue thick. If your design allows it, you’ll have a much easier time if you can maintain a good thick stream of glue from your glue gun.

 

glue gun stencil

 

On Painting

I wasn’t sure which fabric spray to go with, so I picked up both and I’m so glad I did.  On the left is the Tulip Fabric Spray Paint, and on the right is the Simply Spray Stencil Spray.  The Tulip fabric spray was by far the better fabric spray paint.  For one thing, it sprayed better. Unfortunately, the Simply Spray would only come out in huge drops and everything you see on the paper towel is all I could get out of it. It actually stopped working at this point. I read the directions, but there’s always the possibility of user-error, so I’m not quite ready to throw Simply Spray under the bus.

In any case, I went with the Tulip spray paint.

paint-samples

The glue gun stencils came off very easily with not sticking or unwanted marks left behind.

shamrock-stencil

I used cardboard between the layers of the shirts to make sure no paint went through to the other side. You could also use poster board, or even freezer paper.  Anything flat and mostly impermeable.

glue gun stencil shirts

It didn’t take long for the shirts to dry and they were easy and fun enough that I’ll likely use them with the kids next time.

glue gun stencil shirt for st. patrick day

What do you think about the glue gun stencil? Have you tried this process before?  If anybody has any extra tips they’d like to share I’d love to hear them!

 

KCWC at Elsie Marlie

If you sew and have kids you will definitely want to join in on this big sewing party! Meg (Elsie Marley) hosts the Kids Clothes Week Challenge twice each year, Spring and Fall, and it’s basically 7 days of frenzied sewing. It’s always fun to join in with other sewists on the same mission and see what everyone else is making.

I think I end up putting all of my kids’ sewing off until this challenge, because I know I’ll be more likely to get it done! I’m still collecting ideas and patterns, but here is a bit of inspiration from my Little Girly Style board on Pinterest, which I’m sure to be pulling from during this little sewing stint.

little girly style pinterest sources: 1.via  2. Etsy shop Heart and Sew  3. Tree Fall Studio  4. Party of Eight  5. via  6. Oliver + S  7. via

Meg also just put together a KCWC pin board, so be sure to check that out for tons of inspiration!

I tend to focus on girly stuff since that’s what I have, but I’ll be sure to put together some rockin’ boy stuff soon!

Tutorial: 3 No-Sew Halloween Onesies

My littlest is an October baby. She was born a week before Halloween and I only had one halloween-y outfit for her, which she wore to a pumpkin patch and completely swallowed her up. I remember that when it came time to go trick-or-treating with my then 16-month-old daughter I wanted my newborn to be comfy, so I dressed her in a simple onesie and situated her snugly into her sling.

Looking back, I was glad she was comfy that night, but I still wish, for the sake of pictures and such, that I had at least dressed her in a more festive onesie.

Please, don’t make my mistake. 😉  Make a couple of these. They’re so easy and so fun to make that there’s no reason for your little one to not be dressed for the occasion this Halloween.

 

 

To start with, pick up some onesies in whatever size you need. I made these in size 0-3 months, but you can adapt the tutorial to any size, even a regular t-shirt for your big kid.  If you can find them in the right color…Awesome!  If not, just pick up some RIT and follow Dana’s instructions for dying fabric.  I dyed these in purple, orange, and black and the color came out beautiful on all of them.

 

Skeleton Onesie Tutorial

What you need…

(not pictured is a paint brush, which you’ll need to help apply the glue neatly)

  • Cut a rectangle from the freezer paper about the size of your onesie and insert between the layers, with the shiny side facing up (this will help keep the glue from going all the way through and sticking the front to the back).
  • Repeat for each of the sleeves.
  • Cut the ric rac according to the size of your onesie. Cut one piece for the “spine” and 8 smaller pieces for the “ribs.” I cut 4 sets of increasing length ranging between 2″ and 2 1/2″.  (Use a lighter to seal the ends so that they don’t fray.)
  • Arrange the ric-rac on your onesie until you are satisfied with its placement.
  • Use paintbrush to carefully apply a layer of glue to the ric-rac then press it into place on the onesie.

This skeleton onesie was totally inspired by the simple effectiveness of this skeleton costume.

 

Spiderweb Onesie Tutorial

What you need….

(not pictured is a paint brush, which you’ll need to help apply the glue neatly)

  • Cut a rectangle from the freezer paper about the size of your onesie and insert between the layers, with the shiny side facing up (this will help keep the glue from going all the way through and sticking the front to the back).
  • Use your paintbrush to carefully apply the fabric glue to your doily. Start at the center and work your way out, stopping just before you get to the outermost edge.
  • Set doily into place, then press with your fingers.
  • Once the doily has set for a couple minutes, lift the unglued edges and use your paintbrush to finish gluing the underside of the doily.
  • Now cut a rectangle of black felt about 1 1/4″ by 2 1/2″.
  • Fold the rectangle in half lengthwise and cut around the outer edge of the spider shape, as shown below. Then cut 3 slits into the side…making 4 little spider legs.
  • Apply fabric glue to the spider’s body use your fingers to press into place on the doily.
  • Once the spider’s body has set for a couple minutes, lift each leg and carefully apply the glue, spreading the legs as you press them into place.

 

Mummy Onesie Tutorial

What you need…

(not pictured is a paint brush, which you’ll need to help apply the glue neatly, and an iron, for pressing the bias tape into shape)

  • Cut a rectangle from the freezer paper about the size of your onesie and insert between the layers, with the shiny side facing up (this will help keep the glue from going all the way through and sticking the front to the back).
  • Cut about a 1″ circle from the yellow felt, then cut a smaller circle from the black felt.
  • Use the fabric glue to adhere the black eyeball onto the yellow eye.
  • Fold one end of the bias tape over and start arranging the it on your ironing pad. You’ll be making sort of an “M” shape with the tape. It helps to keep the eyeball under the tape to get the angles right.
  • Once you have the tape configured to your liking, fold down the remaining end.
  • Now arrange the eye and bias tape on your onesie and start gluing into place.
  • Once the glue has set for a bit, go through with your finger look for loose spots. Apply more glue to any loose spots and repeat until the pieces are firmly attached.

Sine all of these use fabric glue, please follow the manufacturer’s instructions regarding drying times and laundering.

I love that these are so easy, and since they’re for little ones who will only wear them once or twice before they outgrow them I think the fabric glue is a great choice. However, if I were to make these in big-kid sizes I think I would opt to stitch the pieces down for added durability.

Thanks, and enjoy!